Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Kids of the Black Hole: A Brief History of Punk in Southern California



Popular Music in the 1970s: The Blank Generation

While there is good music happening in every decade, the 1970s were a pretty dismal decade for American popular music.  In the 1960s, artists like Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, The Beatles, and The Rolling Stones gave voice to a new generation of young people.  The music spoke to the astonishing social change that was happening.  Musicians could write creative songs of protest and change, and their music reached a wide audience.



By the early 1970s, however, things began to change.  The 1970s saw the birth of disco, a genre Mark Mothersbaugh of the band DEVO described as "like a beautiful woman with no brain."  The massive corporatization of the pop music industry saw the birth of "white concert rock," arena bands like Kansas and Toto and Boston, whose message was basically "I'm white, I'm a misogynist, I'm a consumer, and I'm proud of it!"  Punk historian Dewar Macleod writes, "The three sounds that dominated the seventies--country/folk rock, prog(ressive) rock, and disco--too often sounded impersonal to those who sought a sense of identification through music."



Something New and Alive

As the pop music industry lost its artistic edge, increasingly large numbers of young people sought something new, a genre that would speak to their particular problems and outlook on life.  Enter punk rock.  In the book Kids of the Black Hole: Punk Rock in Postsuburban California, Dewar Macleod writes, "For those whose eyes and ears were open, who were waiting for something to happen in a world where nothing was happening, punk rock offered an alternative, as music, as vision, as culture.  From 1977 through the 1980s, punk rock spoke to more and more young people throughout Southern California, embodying their experiences, shaping their identities.  They craved a personal connection to the their music and a music that could express their sense of the world."


The Ramones
Punk was not born in Los Angeles, however.  It arrived first from New York (from The Ramones) via London (from The Sex Pistols), but it spread quickly in Southern California.  Early LA bands like The Germs, The Weirdos, and The Dickies adopted the styles and attitudes of British and East Coast punks and quickly created their own scene, though the DIY (do-it-yourself) ethos, starting their own record labels (like Bomp!), booking their own shows at divey clubs (like The Masque), and spreading the punk gospel through zines (like Slash).

Darby Crash of The Germs
Punk music was, in part, a reaction to the blandness of the music business in the 70s.  In a 1977 issue of Flipside zine, one of The Weirdos said, "There's so much shit that the industry's produced.  Just listen to the radio and it all sounds pretty much the same.  For me and the guys in the band, it's more a revolt against all this boring shit.  Even with all the stuff that's out, the radio still does the same thing.  There's nothing fresh--nothing new.  All the industry does is take a lot of money and make something real slick--over and over again." 

Unlike the capitalist music industry, the punk scene was inherently democratic.  According to Greg Shaw, founder of Bomp! records, "The best culture is one that involves everybody, it's participatory…You are not a passive consumer."  Punk was created by the people, for the people.  It was raw, sometimes angry, and sincere.  "Punk was like when you first discover folk art as some wonderful thing," KK Barrett of the Screamers remembered, "All of a sudden you like the mistakes, the handicraft of it, the personal naiveté."  Sociologist Stephen Duncombe defines DIY as "at once a critique of the dominant mode of passive consumer culture and something far more important: the active creation of an alternative culture."  

Slash Zine 1978
Punk in Post-Suburban Orange County

Interestingly, punk was not a strictly urban (LA, NY) phenomenon.  In Southern California, it quickly began to infiltrate the suburbs of Orange County cities like Huntington Beach (with bands like Black Flag and The Descendents) and Fullerton (with The Adolescents, Social Distortion, and The Middle Class).  By the 1970s, suburbs that were once "bedroom communities" serving larger metropolitan areas, began to transform into "post-suburbia"--self-sufficient, mixed-use regions of housing, factories, offices, shops, and services.  Macleod writes, "Just as the U.S. census of 1890 declared the western frontier closed, the census of 1970 declared the closing of another frontier: the 'crabgrass frontier'."



Eddie of the OC band Eddie and the Subtitles described Orange County in the 1970s as "an unbelievable, mindless, sexless, funless monster that should be permanently shut down."  The "post-suburban" towns of Orange County began to spawn their own unique brand of punks, who were "now fully 'postmodern youth,' whose alienation resulted from the corporate-controlled media and consumer environments [which] increasingly supplanted the home, family, school, and workplace as sites for socialization." 

Macleod explains, "Young people in post-suburbia were now not simply consumers, but…an active participant in the shopping spectacle.  For these young people, the shopping mall is not merely an economic space where exchanges take place but a symbolic social space for everyone to come alive in and a pervasive metaphor for life.  This condition affected youth throughout society, not merely 'delinquents' or members of subcultures.  All youth--especially in post-suburbia--were increasingly hailed, identified, and self-identified as isolated, fragmented, individual consumers."

In his essay "Inside Exopolis: Scenes from Orange County" sociologist Edward W. Soja describes the region's "creatively erosive postmodern geographies…where everyday life is thematically spin doctored and consciousness itself comes in prepackaged forms."  Macleod explains how "the car, the mall, the office park, and tract home replaced the street as the sites for everyday life.  What was historically new by the 1970s was the destruction of public space, and the accompanying commodification of private space."  Politics came to be dominated by massive faceless development companies like "the Irvine Company, which held almost complete control over the political, economic, and social development of the region in the post-war period."

The Irvine Company
Politically, Orange County was very conservative, spawning such punk-hated politicians as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.   The Lincoln Club, the "good old buys" Republican bankrollers, were firmly entrenched in Orange County, and helped get Reagan elected.  Hand in hand with the conservative politics went mega-churches like Costa Mesa's Crystal Cathedral and the Trinity Broadcasting Network.

Because of the economic and social value of real estate in Orange County, the politics in the OC were "increasingly centered around issues of homeowner self-defense."

Given such artificial, "creatively erosive", isolated, conservative, self-centered environments as Orange County cities, is it any wonder that young people would seek to rebel and create their own, creatively vibrant communities?  The band that perhaps best spoke to (and against) the alienated, isolated, fragmented post-suburban condition was Fullerton's own The Middle Class.  

The Middle Class



There is an entire section of the book Kids of the Black Hole devoted to The Middle Class, and I will quote it verbatim, because it's good:

"The Middle Class--three brothers (ages fifteen, seventeen, and twenty-one) and a friend from Santa Ana and Fullerton down in Orange County--had ventured the two-hour drive into the Hollywood scene as early as 1978, when they went to Brendan Mullen hoping for a gig at the Masque and almost got laughed all the way home.  "Having been advised to cut their hair and punk-out their dress, they were summarily dismissed to the suburbs, presumably to pass into a well-deserved obscurity," one zine writer observed.  "However, fate intervened in the form of Hector of the Zeros who booked them as opening support for a show featuring The Controllers and The Germs and, after that, for the next six months, they played support to many of the local Holllywood scene bands.' After their first show at Larchmont Hall in April, where the crowd 'stood in a semi-circle and nobody moved,' they gigged regularly as the token 'suburban' band.  Slash referred to their first show in a column titled "The 'Hey, You Mean They Got Punks in Those Places??' Dept."  Noting the blasé reaction and blank stares The Middle Class received, Slash commented, 'sometimes them scene-making punx are worse than the fuckin' Spanish Inquisition!" and asked the prescient question, 'Will the next New Wave come from the great Wasteland?' (This was at a time when the term 'new wave' had not yet been rejected by punks.)

The Hollywood scene accepted the Middle Class, at least to some extent.  But even when some of their members moved into the Canterbury (apartments in LA--a sort of punk commune), they did not lose their identity as a 'suburban' band, and the insider crowd did not quite know what to do with them.  Taking the stage looking 'like a bunch of rampaging Scientologists,' they defied all fashion and music conventions even at a moment when conventions were not so rigidly set within punk.  By the summer of 1978, they were making converts, as this Slash review attests: 'These guys looked normal.  Like writing a paper in the library normal.  How come they sounded like twisted metal air raids and dynamite fumes?  I was shocked.  If you look like that, you're not supposed to sound like that.  Yet it was obvious: the mob was pogoing with genuine furor, the aggression meter was in the red zone, this was certified punk fever grade triple-A beware of imitations.  I've seen fast bands, but these unknowns run with the best."  The reviewer concluded, "And that curly-haired singer should, according to basic laws of physics, end up with his vocal chords tied in a knot after 5 minutes."  Another Slash reviewer the following month described their shows as "intense, teeth-gritting affairs that leave the participant dazed, stunned, even irritated."  the reviewer noted the 'chaos and confusion' that resulted from 'the incitable nature of their strange, assaulting music coupled with the growing number of their unpredictably rabid fans.'  The cumulative effect was 'not unlike kissing a semi at full speed.'


The Middle Class never brought their own crowd of fans and followers with them to Hollywood, but they never completely left their post-suburban home, either.  Like traditional bohemians, and like other LA punks, they made the trip into the city to enact their art.  But they did not reinvent themselves completely in the process.  They didn't change their names, and they didn't change their dress.  The cover of their record 'Out of Vogue'--a diatribe against mass culture--depicts a mundane Southern California suburban scene: two young girls stand in the middle of a street, surrounded and almost dwarfed by the still life of a housing tract with Big Wheels, a basketball backboard, and a Volkswagen bus in a driveway.  The cover scene depicted not only their roots, but their continuing daily reality as 'the MIddle Class' and they returned to these images throughout their career.  As a post suburban band, the Middle Class redefined the aesthetics of punk, both musically and visually."

Kids of the Black Hole

Members of The Middle Class started booking shows at The Galaxy in Fullerton, a roller rink turned punk venue.  Other Orange County bands followed the lead of these suburban pioneers, formed bands, and started playing a new variety of punk invented by The Middle Class--hardcore.  As the name suggests, the music was especially aggressive form of punk, often raging against the cultural and political wasteland that was 1970s and 80s Orange County.

Out of Hermosa Beach came Black Flag, who helped establish The Church (literally an old church building) as a haven for punks to rehearse, play shows, and live. An early bass player from Black Flag described one of their early practices:

"BANG!! the drummer started smashing out a fast trashy straight 4 pattern and the wiry little singer started bellowing  around wildly and Greg's body lurched forward as he underwent a remarkable transition from Jeckyl to Hyde.  His head shook, eyes flashed and teeth bared maniacally as he began to grind thick chords out of a guitar that in the shadowy light could have been mistaken for a chainsaw.  Within seconds it was over.  Jeckyl calmly stepped out of his Hyde as if stepping out of a routine nightmare."


In true DIY fashion, Black Flag eschewed the record industry and formed their own label, SST Records.

Macleod writes, "New punk bands emerged in droves, and while many of them merely played the 1-2-3-4 sound of the Ramones as fast as they could, others introduced interesting variations, combining diverse influences and sounds.  Over the next couple of years bands from around the South Bay and inland Orange County came to play parties in Huntington Beach--new bands like the Circle Jerks, Red Cross, the Adolescents, Agent Orange, and Social Distortion, in addition to the Middle Class and Black Flag.  Eventually a couple of key clubs began to book hardcore shows in post suburbia: the Cuckoo's Nest in Costa Mesa and the Fleetwood in Redondo Beach."

Mike Ness of Social Distortion made his Fullerton apartment into a haven for local punks, which was immortalized by the Adolescents song "KIds of the Black Hole."  

Out of Huntington Beach came The Descencents, whose music offered an ironic commentary on the OC, like the song "Suburban Home":

I want to be stereotyped
I want to be classified
I wanna be a clone
I want a suburban home
I wanna be masochistic
I wanna be a statistic
I don't want no hippie pad
I want a house just like mom and dad

In many ways, the punks succeeded in creating something new and distinct from the cultural norms they had inherited.  Through music, zines, and communal spaces, "punks created a dispersed, yet interconnected mass subculture."



Is Punk Dead?
Is the oft-used phrase "Punk is Dead" true?  Did punk die?  That depends who you talk to.  If you talk to Sean and Lee from Burger Records in Fullerton, they will tell you "Hell no."  If you talk to an old school punk, they might say "Hell yes."  As with all art, punk is in the ear of the beholder.  Certainly punk still exists today.  In the 1990s, punk actually became a successful commercial product, with bands like No Doubt, Green Day, and The Offspring selling platinum records.  Punk purists may argue against the 90s genre "pop punk."  But punk, as it was originally conceived--angry, political, underground--also still exists, though it has largely remained underground.  

Major record companies and popular radio stations, understandably, continue to take little interest in music that is supposed to disturb and rattle the listener.  As in the early days of punk, much of the best punk music today is being recorded and distributed DIY-style, with limited pressings of 45s, LPs, CDs, tapes, and MP3s.  In some ways, computers and the internet have democratized music in a way never before dreamed of by early punks.  Today, anyone can record and distribute their music with a laptop, or even a phone.  In my view, punk is alive and well, still growing and evolving and combining with other styles, still responding to and reacting against mass culture and conformity.

Punk ain't dead.

34 comments:

  1. decendendts were from the so bay , hermosa beach, not oc.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kristina Nucci
    T/Th 10:00-11:15

    I really enjoyed reading this blog. I found it to be really interesting and well written. Music is something that can define and move people in so many different ways. In my History of Rock class we learn how bands and artists are influenced by music they hear from other musicians. The music that is made in a certain time period can change the way people act and change their actions depending on how the music makes them feel. In the article it is said how kids would start listening to punk in the 1970's in Orange County. I think that having more rough and emotional music allowed kids to be more creative and made them feel more free. It was interesting reading about The Middle Class, as a band that used their suburban roots to create a fresh edge in their music. Album covers define the band in many ways and can make you love them more based on the image on the cover. The Middle Class's album cover allowed people to feel and understand that suburban areas can make you feel trapped. The movement of punk music truly did change the way people acted and lived their lives. There used to be a set way of how to do things, and Punk music allowed there to be other options and outlets to just feel alive. People, especially teens, are constantly feeling out of place, frustrated, or just not happy, and having music that allowed you to feel something more than boredom was monumental. Over the years punk has been transforming and I agree that the classic "original" punk is mostly underground. The music that started it all, The Ramones and Sex Pistols are still very popular today. Kids and teenagers today still are looking for an outlet and many people do still listen to this music. Over the years I feel like it has continued getting more and more popular because people can see and understand that it truly is something that defined and changed a generation. When punk began in the 70's it was so out there and just great that it took off for most kids. There had been in the past other defining musicians that changed the music scene and caused more of a free feeling among people. As said above Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, and Elvis were all monumental to music and culture of their time. Music has and always will be an escape for most people. It will continue to change and transform into something that society wants and needs.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Alexander Real
    Tuesday and Thursday, 1:00 - 2:15

    Very interesting article. I never even knew that these local punk bands even existed. And for starters, I certainly didn't know that the 70s were thought to be a time of dismay for American popular music. Then again, I always thought that Disco and the like WAS the popular music, but what do I know? That's a sincere statement, by the way. Anyways, it sure is nice to be reading something about Rock 'N' Roll in my English class. You obviously don't know this, but I am a rocker to my very core. Really, I like almost every genre of music, aside from perhaps polka, some country, and a few others, but, other than that, I happen to like about every kind of music I've heard so far in my life, but Rock is by far my favorite. I'm not talking all this new age garbage though, I'm talking ACTUAL Rock. The classics; The Beatles (of course), The Rolling Stones, The Doors, later bands like Metallica, Iron Maiden, Nine Inch Nails, even Marilyn Manson... But my favorite band of the old, classic rock genres are Pink Floyd. I have all their albums, and, to this day, I find myself hopelessly compelled by Roger Waters's deeply inspired lyrics, David Gilmour's unbelievable guitar prowess that demonstrates above all how meaning can be conveyed through sound, and without RIchard Wright and Nick Mason and even Syd Barrett, the band would be nothing. All of these inspirational people came together to form a band that has shaped me beyond what I ever imagined possible from a band... I know that that was entirely unrelated to your article, but when on the subject of music, I simply have to bring up Pink Floyd.
    Again, though, I had no idea what was going on in the 70s in terms of music. I think it's fascinating and also entirely logical that punk emerged during this time, because without it, Rock may very well have died in the popular beats and meaningless slush of Disco and such. Some of the most influential bands of all time were punk, and it's so interesting to really see why they became what they did and how they did what they did. On another note, I wholeheartedly agree with the answer you gave to the question, "Is Punk dead?" It's all about who you ask. Different perspectives and different ways of looking at the world. That's what we're learning about in my Philosophy 290 class. Unless you're Parmenides, in which case, the only answer you would give to any question is "It is." But we're not, so we can actually create a rational basis for what we believe and come to a logical conclusion through facts and honest life experiences. Thank you, Plato.

    By the way, Mr. Latour, if you want to check out some of my poetry and other creative writing, here's a link to my blog: http://theunexpectedeverything.blogspot.com
    I would gladly appreciate some feedback and constructive criticism. I am an aspiring writer, and when I'm famous, I will remember to personally thank you and everyone who helped me along the way with AT LEAST a million dollars cash... Just something to think about.

    ReplyDelete
  4. class 101: Jamie Back. Tuesday and Thursday's at 10 am.

    Reading over all of the articles that you do post brings a creative mind for many of us, especially me. Seeing that only about four people have went on and actually posted comments on your blogs so far, although it is an assignment, is kind of surprising. It is an easy grade and somethings are actually really interesting to read about that a lot of us have never known before.

    Learning about Rock n' Role is something I have never taken the time out to actually do. For you to take the time and research a lot that is based in the 70's is pretty cool. Knowing that there were bands that were around the OC area is really awesome, and even knowing that they were teenagers and had aspiring dreams just like us.

    I am personally not that into rock so therefor I did not get out of it probably what I should have but i did learn quite a bit of interesting facts. How hard they worked really is shown through your writing about all of the artists.

    The way you direct class is very different and I can tell you are trying to pull all of us out of our shell and try new things and ways to expand our thoughts and ways of thinking. Thank you for that!

    I am not certain if punk rock or rock at all has died out I just believe that to this day it is more mixed and everyone is into a little bit of everything. There is so much music in the world and different types I am not sure that anyone could just stick to one.

    People in all types of music industries had to work hard. especially when you are young and you are not from a rich family it is very hard. They must have all been talented and dedicated. Those are types of things I wish I could go back in the day to see.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Andrew Humphrey
    English 101 Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:15AM.

    After reading “Sellabrations vs Celebrations,” “Chicano Art at The Muckenthaler,” and “Kids of the Black Hole: A Brief History of Punk in Southern California,” a common theme stuck out to me. If I had to put it in just one word, it would be: “expression.” And now that I really think about it, I can’t think of a better word. Before I explain, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed reading all of these blogs because of that feeling I got every time I finished reading one. It continued to give me that feeling of realization, a moment where your thoughts are written down and actually put in front of you as words. Within the first blog I read, it truly dawned on me how greedy we can be. To be brutally honest, Professor La Tour couldn’t have hit that one more on the head. So many events are more towards the “sellabration” side instead of actually celebrating at an event for the community. As cheesy as it sounds, places like the Downtown Fullerton Art Walk almost restore faith in humanity. For once, greed isn’t a main goal, and I really appreciate that. Not only that, it gives other people a way to express themselves. With that being stated, we’re back to the theme I had proposed earlier. I believe that all these blogs represent “expression” because if you truly think about it, our culture is one of the best ways we can really express our thoughts. Take the Chicano art for example; all of those paintings described how the artist felt at the time, what they’ve gone through, or still involved with even today. Not only that, they force us as the observers to not only look at it, but challenge us to agree, analyze, criticize, or even just ponder it. Lastly, I believe that punk rock is completely about expressing themselves as the artists they are and getting their messages out to the world. This statement holds true with many of the bands’ overall messages to deal with social conflict, culture, and politics. I find it interesting how similar Chicano art is compared to punk rock is in a sense. If you really think about it, the artists both have the same goal: to make the observer or listener truly think about what their message is. Above all I would say that these blogs shined a new light on my mind about how unique our society is and to really just have fun with it instead of doing things just for greedy purposes.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Pamela Lares
    Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:15
    Reading the three articles it opened my eyes to how we have let money and socially acceptable ways of life control the way things are run, but it doesn’t have to be that way. To start off, the article “sellebrations” vs. Celebrations really showed how much the majority of our community has been so involved in making money that it shows that our culture has become just that, money hungry people that look for any excuse to make money sacrificing the lessons on culture that can be displayed instead. I also went to the street fair and had a really good time with my friends and I did spend a good amount of money but now that I think of it I didn’t get a cultural experience and now that I think of it I live in orange county but I just live there I don’t embrace it and take the time to appreciate it.
    What I’m going to get out of this class is how to appreciate and discover my hometown. Like people that do events like art galleries and community events, to show the community’s potential for example in the art show mentioned in the article Chicano Art @ The Muckenthaler. I can see what Mexican and Chicano artists have come up with and being of Mexican parents I am in the same culture as these artists and I can understand and analyze these paintings in my own way. It is a really good thing that people reach out to these artists because it is obvious that they have talent that needs to be displayed. I liked all the paintings that went along with the article because they were all unique, some were abstract and portraits of people like the painting “like father, like son” by Sergio Vasquez were very realistic, something I really liked was the way the eyes were painted they had such a personal look to them that it made them look human like and that goes for all the paintings of people.
    Just like art is a form of expression so is music and it is all kinds of music. A genre of music that I didn’t really understand till now was punk, yes I’ve heard a few songs, yes I had a few punk friends in middle school, but no I never took the time to see what it is all about. In the article Kids of the Black Hole :….Punk in Southern California it talks about punk music, how it came about and what it stands for and I have a new found respect for that music because I see that they are non-conformist that have a particular way of expression towards what they don’t like in society. In fact we should all have a little nit of punk in us to stand up for what we believe in, express the way we want, and not “sellebrate” life but really have a celebratory view on life.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Jennifer Huynh
    Eng 101 TuTh 11:30-12:45

    After reading your blog about the local punks, I found it pretty fascinating that you still actually keep in check of those old artists. The article includes so many details that I had never knew about, especially the fact that these people even existed. Hah. Although I am not so much of a fan of Rock music, there was one part of the article that engaged me, that was, "Is Punk dead?"

    Based from your article and the comments above, I believe punk rock is still being listened to today. Due to our present, more people listen to a little bit of everything ... There are very few people who just listens to only Rock music, especially old rock music.

    I appreciate your effort in informing us about Rock music, I really did learn something I never knew.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anthony Lopez. English 101. CSUF. Tues/Thurs. 1:00pm

    After reading over this article “Sellabrations vs. Celebrations,” it reminds me a lot about the “celebrations” my hometown tries to do. They say the reason for the outdoor activities is to bring our community together, but as the years pass, it only seems to be more about them making money. When I was younger I remember a lot of the venders and people that would go, would go to have a good time and enjoy free stuff. Now the city charges for everything! Parking, games, and whatever else they have there. It just goes to show that there so called “celebrations” aren’t what they make them to be.
    There is this event that the city has once a year in uptown Whittier for old car clubs to come together and just enjoy the art of the classics. The reason I enjoyed this event that they held was because every year my dad and myself would take place in it. We would take my 1951 chevy along with my uncles 1933 chevy to have a good time, until they started charging for every little thing. The point im trying to get across here is that my city is more worried about making money than to see the community come together and enjoy themselves.
    However the art walk that you have started does sound interesting. I cant say im a huge fan of art work but I do like to draw old cars. A lot of people say I am pretty good at drawing but im not sure if its true or they are just being nice. It must take a lot of time and money to put something big like the art work together. I have a lot of respect for you, because your not letting anything get in your way of success.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Audrey de Guzman
    English 101
    Tues/Thur 1:00-2:15

    In response to the blog “ ‘Sellabrations’ vs. Celebrations”, I would have to disagree with Professor La Tour. In my experience within my own community, “sellabrations” and celebrations are very closely related. Yes, there are many events such as Forth of July weekend or the Walnut Family Festival that are completely free to attend and attract large amounts of families to “celebrate” big events. From our independence as a country or to celebrate our lives in the community of Walnut, there is a call for a celebration of some sort. Where there is a party, there is always food. More often times than not, there are food sponsors at city events such as, Chick-fil-a, Robeks, Subway, L&L, In-n-Out, or local food trucks, selling food to the public. In my experience, having these sponsored fast food chains at events attract a bigger crowd of people than selling hotdogs and burgers. By provoking more people to get involved with local events, it brings the community closer together. Don’t you think that having a large amount of people at an event, socializing, and having fun with each other, is more of a “celebration”, than not having anyone attend at all? Unlike the blog, I believe that attracting more people to events by having sponsored local businesses will also bring the community together for an equally genuine celebration. Not only will the locally loved, fast food chains attract more people, but it also supports our local businesses who are all owned by families who also live within the community. Every business’ goal is to, “make money and attract local business”, is it not? It is the only way a business will succeed. Just because a business is selling their products at a community event does not take away from the meaning of the celebration. To me, it is only a bonus for those attending and it helps bait individuals to get out of their houses and get involved. There is also no rule or requirement for anyone to purchase anything from the sponsors in order to attend the event. Also, it is not uncommon for these local fast food chains to give back to the community by sponsoring local sports teams or the Performing Arts. All in all, I do not believe that “sellabration” is any different from “celebration”. In many ways, I think that it supports each other. I can only speak for my experiences in my community, and I am sure that opinions can differ from city to city.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Jeffrey Barner
    tues-Thurs 10am
    In High School I was in a rock band that went on tour, had sponsors, and a deal with a production company. We would play a lot of different venues, but a majority of the places consisted with modern metal and punk rock music. All of the metal pretty much sounded the same no matter where the show was. However, when it came to punk rock there was some easy distinctions to be made. Especially when it came to Nor Cal punk and So cal punk.( Seattle punk is a different story) For the sake of this blog I will focus on So Cal punk. In orange county punk is alive and well, but slowly getting taken over by hipster indie bands. All of the old guys that still play shows and make it out to watch them are the same kids that grew up in the OC suburbs. One night I was playing at the Slide Bar in downtown Fullerton. I wasn't old enough to be there in the first place but hell I didn't care. Anyways the band going on after us was comprised of old punk rock men. They asked me how old I was I I told them seventeen. Then one of the guys turned around and said “and they say it's dead." Gradually getting to know some of these guys they would tell me stories. They would talk about where they would go to practice. Ditching school just to play some music somewhere. Another thing they constantly talked about was seeing bands like social distortion in the area. Unfortunateley, everyone in Fullerton can only seem qto remember ‘No Doubt’ as bad as that sounds. Punk rock is a staple of the OC and this article really brings that to life.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Jon Kocker
    Eng 101
    11:30-12:45

    In response to "'Selebrations' vs Celebrations" I agree that yes large corporations want more consumers, but they need to be apart of it draw a crowd. I don't believe it should be ran by just strictly larger corporations, but their presence is needed. With the help of larger corporations, the smaller local businesses also get the advertisement and can help their business grow. By having just do it yourself kind of set up, yes it does allow a wider range of unknown artists help get a name out, but they don't get the networking they need to truely get their name out there. I believe a balance is needed. In my hometown a new up and coming chilli take out place got major publicity due to a corporate ran event, more than it could of gotten just on it's own.
    As for the 70's and the appearance of punk rock bands, they expressed themselves lyrically through their music. With disco It was more of body expression through new dance crazes and what not. What it comes down to is how people like to express themselves. I think now we are going through something like this with the new sudden popularity of electric dance music. There is a generic tone in a lot of the music produced by people trying to keep up with the times in America. When you go to Europe however, the scene is completely different. You still hear the same eight count, but there is a wider range of build ups and base drops. Music used to be about getting something out there. Now it's just about making money, who can get the most hits on youtube. Something needs to give.

    ReplyDelete
  12. You topic is very great and useful for us…Thank you for that information you article.
    Signature:
    i like play games happy wheels online friv , girlsgogames , games2girls and play happy wheels 2 games

    ReplyDelete
  13. The blog or and best that is extremely useful to keep I can share the ideas. Age Of War 2
    Big Farm | Slitherio | Tank Trouble
    Of the future as this is really what I was looking for, I am very comfortable and pleased to come here. Thank you very much.
    Happy Wheels | Goodgeme Empire | Slither.io

    ReplyDelete
  14. Life becomes more interesting and wonderful when you share your memorable moments with friends and family through unique photographs. You can create your own unique style impressed with image editing software. And after hours of work stress you can also

    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick

    ReplyDelete
  15. Life becomes more interesting and wonderful when you share your memorable moments with friends and family through unique photographs. You can create your own unique style impressed with image editing software. And after hours of work stress you can also

    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick
    Square Quick

    ReplyDelete
  16. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.

    subway surf , baixar subway surf, subway surf download , download subway surf

    ReplyDelete
  17. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.

    subway surf , baixar subway surf, subway surf download , download subway surf

    ReplyDelete
  18. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.

    Snapchat , Snapchat, Snapchat , Snapchat

    ReplyDelete
  19. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.

    Snapchat , Snapchat, Snapchat , Snapchat

    ReplyDelete
  20. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.

    entrar hotmail agora , hotmail entrar, entrar hotmail , entrar no hotmail

    ReplyDelete
  21. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.

    entrar hotmail agora , hotmail entrar, entrar hotmail , entrar no hotmail

    ReplyDelete
  22. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.
    dream league soccer download , dream league soccer apk , download dream league soccer , dream league soccer

    ReplyDelete
  23. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.
    dream league soccer download , dream league soccer apk , download dream league soccer , dream league soccer

    ReplyDelete
  24. Life becomes more interesting and wonderful when you share your memorable moments with friends and family through unique photographs. You can create your own unique style impressed with image editing software. And after hours of work stress you can also

    whatsapp messenger
    baixar whatsapp
    whatsapp plus
    download whatsapp
    whatsapp baixar

    ReplyDelete
  25. Life becomes more interesting and wonderful when you share your memorable moments with friends and family through unique photographs. You can create your own unique style impressed with image editing software. And after hours of work stress you can also

    whatsapp messenger
    baixar whatsapp
    whatsapp plus
    download whatsapp
    whatsapp baixar

    ReplyDelete
  26. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.

    baixar banana kong , banana kong , download banana kong , banana kong download , banana kong

    ReplyDelete
  27. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.

    baixar banana kong , banana kong , download banana kong , banana kong download , banana kong

    ReplyDelete
  28. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.
    Hotmail
    Hotmail Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión Hotmail
    Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión Hotmail

    ReplyDelete
  29. You need to have time to take care of the active. It in fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to far added agreeable from you.
    Hotmail
    Hotmail Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión Hotmail
    Iniciar Sesión
    Iniciar Sesión Hotmail

    ReplyDelete
  30. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.
    facebook iniciar sesión , facebook, iniciar sesion , iniciar sesion facebook

    ReplyDelete
  31. Mostly people have all the same things when they are writing academic task or any other writing, especially light music most people like during the writing.
    facebook iniciar sesión , facebook, iniciar sesion , iniciar sesion facebook

    ReplyDelete
  32. I really thank you for the valuable info on this great subject and look forward to more great posts. Thanks a lot for enjoying this beauty article with me.

    geometry dash pc, geometry Dash, geometry dash lite, geometry dash play, geometry dash online

    ReplyDelete
  33. I really thank you for the valuable info on this great subject and look forward to more great posts. Thanks a lot for enjoying this beauty article with me.

    geometry dash pc, geometry Dash, geometry dash lite, geometry dash play, geometry dash online

    ReplyDelete